Origin of Tiananmen Square.

Tiananmen Square was built in the 15th year of Yongle in Ming Dynasty (AD 1417), and its designer was Kuai Xiang, a famous architect in Ming Dynasty. At the end of Ming Dynasty, Chengtianmen was burned again. In 1651, it was rebuilt and renamed Tiananmen Square. Tiananmen Square, as a symbol of Beijing and China, has attracted the attention of people all over the country and the world, and its solemn figure is the main component of China’s national emblem.

Tiananmen Square, as a symbol of Beijing and China, has attracted the attention of people all over the country and the world, and its solemn figure is the main component of China’s national emblem. Tiananmen Square was built in the fifteenth year of Yongle in Ming Dynasty (AD 1417), and its designer was Kuai Xiang, a famous architect in Ming Dynasty. Kuai Xiang was born in Yufan Village, Wuxian County, Suzhou, and is a hereditary craftsman. In the fifteenth year of Yongle in Ming Dynasty, Emperor Zhu Di moved the capital from Nanjing to Beijing, and Kuai Xiang, who was only 21 years old, also came to Beijing as Zhu Di’s retinue. According to the emperor’s will, after four years of hard work, he designed and built a wooden archway with carved beams and painted buildings in 1421, which was the earliest Tiananmen Square, formerly known as Chengtianmen. In July 1457, Chengtianmen was burned by fire. Eight years later, Ming Yingzong ordered Bai Gui, minister of the Ministry of Industry and Commerce, to preside over the reconstruction, while Bai Gui asked Kuai Xiang to give advice and build it as it is now. At the end of Ming Dynasty, Chengtianmen was burned again. In 1651, it was rebuilt. The newly-built tower is 33.7 meters high, 9 wide and 5 deep to show the dignity of the emperor, and it was renamed Tiananmen Square. This name is still in use today.

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